Analyze collective bargaining processes and the major factors of contract negotiation.

Week Five Learning Outcomes This week students will:

1. Analyze collective bargaining processes and the major factors of contract negotiation.

2. Evaluate hazardous conditions and compliance issues.

Readings Read the following chapters in: A Framework for Human Resource Management:

1. Chapter 9: Managing Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining

2. Chapter 10: Protecting Safety and Health

Discussions

To participate in the following Discussion Forums, go to this week’s Discussion link in the left navigation:

1. Contract Negotiations

Answer the questions to the case, “Negotiating with the Writers Guild of America,” at the end of Chapter 9. Explain your answers in 200 words. Respond to at least two of your fellow students’ postings.

2. The New Safety Program

Answer the questions to the case, “The New Safety Program,”  at the end of Chapter 10. Explain your answers in 200 words. Respond to at least two of your fellow students’ postings.

Assignments

To complete this assignment, go to this week’s Assignment link in the left navigation:

Stress and Burnout

Find at least two articles through ProQuest that examines the problems, both to the organization and its employees, associated with stress and burnout. Summarize your findings in a 3-5 page paper. Be sure to properly cite your resources using APA style.

INSTRUCTOR Guidance-

Week 4 in Review

There are inherent risks in allowing emotional influences to facilitate one’s decision, especially when attempting to balance moral and legal aspects of a situation. Ethics and integrity are certainly at the forefront in regard to how Black will approach a viable solution. In the short term, honesty can be quite expensive. Many people do the right thing just because it is the right thing to do.

The Paycheck Fairness Act is another step in the right direction. As many have noted, the journey has been a long one, but the journey continues. “Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) reintroduced the Paycheck Fairness Act. The bill would provide a much-needed update to the Equal Pay Act of 1963 by closing some of the loopholes that have made the law less effective over time. So while the Ledbetter Act gave employees back their day in court to challenge a wage gap, the Paycheck Fairness Act would give employees the legal tools they need to challenge the wage gap itself.” http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/economy-a-budget/279603-our-journey-is-not-complete-equal-pay-requires-passage-of-paycheck-fairness-act#ixzz2Rf2EJWoY

It would seem the accounting practices opened the door for the leaders to do the wrong. As Dessler (2011) explained “. . . the lack of accounting transparency enabled the company’s managers to make Enron’s financial performance look better than it actually was” (p. 258).  This lack of good accounting methods is really where the problems began, yet so many people overlook it. Why? It is too easy to blame leadership. It would seem that the leaders at Enron rejected the “key fundamentals of accounting”, which includes it being “guided by principles, standards, concepts and assumptions . . . [as well as positive ethical decisions]” (Ashford University, 2007, p.8). Accounting methods void of such key principles was at the root of Enron’s downfall, and the leaders utilized it to further their unethical and immoral decisions.

Ashford University. (2007). MBA essentials: Accounting, finance, economics. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, Inc. Dessler, G. (2011).  A framework for human resource management. (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ:     Prentice Hall, Inc.

In a study reported by LiveScience.com and originally published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, “the researchers asked a group of people if they considered themselves moral, and if they would cheat on a test. The people who said they would never cheat described themselves as very moral — no surprise there. But the people who said they would indeed cheat also described themselves as very moral” (McManus, 2008). http://responsibility-project.libertymutual.com/blog/a-moral-identity-crisis#fbid=gk4D29atSPj

One must assess what role subcultures had on Enron’s ultimate path. Access the following link (http://www.thesustainableworkforce.org/index.php/research-outputs/articles/item/65-the-role-of-organizational-subcultures-and-employment-modes-in-the-translation-of-hr-strategy-into-hr-practice), an article titled The Role of Organizational Subcultures and Employment Modes in the Translation of HR Strategy into HR Practice.

Sustainable Workforce; Palthe, J. & Kossek, E. 2003. The role of organizational subcultures and employment modes in the translation of HR strategy into HR practice, Journal of Organizational Change Management, 16(2): 287-308.

Week 5 Instructors Guidance Labor Relations refers to the ongoing interactions between management and employees. “Labor relations includes employees’, employers’ and unions’ legally protected activities, unfair labor and management practices, union organizing activities, union recognition and representation elections, collective bargaining and union contract administration” (http://www.shrm.org/hrdisciplines/laborrelations/Pages/LaborRelIntro.aspx). Commonly associated with unionization, a multitude if issues result from the practice of labor relations, including: The organization of unions Union recognition Election of union officials Certification and decertification Authorization and deauthorization. The relationships are complex and often adversarial. Where one stands on unionization is often attributable to one’s position in the organization, the industry itself and an exhaustive list of internal and external factors. Unions were undoubtedly the result of years of abusive practices by organizations in a time where manufacturing was the dominant economic force. Labor relations became highly regulated and subject to collective bargaining agreements and dispute resolution. Many laws were enacted (National Labor Relations Act; Labor Management Relations Act; Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act to name a few) to facilitate and control the interactions. Unionization has seen a clear decline nationally, which has led many unions to seek membership in developing countries. This move has created both benefits and problems. Workplace Safety and Health Workplace safety is an area of great concern and focus in the field of HR. It seems every day there is another instance of workplace violence or reports of injury resulting from accidental or negligence activities — all of which adds in most cases to further laws in an attempt to create a safe work environment. Read the following for the “Latest News” in regard to safety and security: http://www.shrm.org/hrdisciplines/safetysecurity/Pages/default.aspx. Work place safety is at the forefront of HR topics in light of the recent (and ongoing) instances of workplace violence. Monitoring the work environment is a critical aspect of avoidance and detection. Here is a list of important considerations that identifies warning signs and possible appropriate actions:

Warning signs of troubled employees:

Employees usually don’t “snap”; indicators of problems tend to build up over time.  Here are some indicators that often precede critical incidents: 1) increased tension at work, 2) increased use of alcohol or drugs, 3) increased absenteeism, 4) poor appearance or hygiene, 5) depression/withdrawal, 6) violation of company policies, 7) severe mood swings or unstable responses to problems, 8) anger or rage, 9) paranoia, 10) bringing personal problems to work, 11) talking about weapons or violence, 12) suicidal comments, 13) pending discipline or termination.

Some training steps/preventive measures

1)      Every company should have a zero tolerance policy on threats and violence.

2)      If employees sense something, they should be encouraged to say something to supervisors, a tip line, their EAP, or a crisis team.

3)      If an employee is terminated, all other employees should know right away that Joe is no longer with the company.

4)      All employees should be aware of a “code word” alert that can be shared by PA, phone, or other methodologies.

5)      All employees should be trained in “what if” scenarios.

WEEK 5 RESPONSES—Disc. 1

Michael Henderson Email this Author 6/26/2013 5:28:42 PM
The producers said the WGA was not bargaining in good faith. What did they mean by that, and do you think the evidence is sufficient to support the claim?  In good faith, to me, means that these two entities should have dealt with each other honestly and fairly in regards to the current contract.  According to the book “Good-faith bargaining means that proposals are matched with counterproposals and that both parties make every reasonable effort to arrive at an agreement. It does not mean that either party is compelled to agree to a proposal. Nor does it require that either party make any specific concessions (although as a practical matter, some may be necessary)” (Dessler pg.276).  The producers were the ones withholding information about the revenue increases from 2000-2006 so that would make for them not acting in good faith.  However, the two parties had met numerous times to come to an agreement over the current contract and nothing was done.  The WGA threatened strikes which would further delay any feasible outcome.  It is two sided.  The WGA, in my opinion, has more of a reason to say that the producers did not act in good faith due to the withholding of information.

The WGA did eventually strike. What tactics could the producers have used to fight back once the strike began? What tactics do you think the WGA used?  “A strike is a withdrawal of labor” (Dessler pg.281).  The strike in question is an economic strike.  I assume in this case the producers are sort of like management over the WGA.  “Employers can make several responses when they become the object of a strike. One is to shut down the affected area and thus halt their operations until the strike is over. A second alternative is to contract out work during the duration of the strike in order to blunt the effects of the strike on the employer. A third alternative is for the employer to continue operations, perhaps using supervisors and other nonstriking workers. A fourth alternative is the hiring of replacements for the strikers. In an economic strike, such replacements can be deemed permanent and would not have to be let go to make room for strikers who decided to return to work. If the strike were an unfair labor practice strike, the strikers would be entitled to return to their jobs if the employer makes an unconditional offer for them to do so” (Dessler pg.281).  Any of these options would make come sort of change in the stagnant situation both parties were dealing with, however, coming to an agreement would be the most suitable for both involved.

This was a conflict between professional and creative people (the WGA) and TV and movie producers. Do you think the conflict was therefore different in any way than are the conflicts between, say, the auto workers or Teamsters unions against auto and trucking companies? Why?  I think the two are one in the same.  It is a struggle between workers and management.  Unions are around to protect workers’ rights, wages and working conditions.  This scenario is not different because it involves writers and producers.

What role (with examples, please) did negotiating skills seem to play in the WGA-producers negotiations?  The negotiation on both sides of the spectrum was an attempt at ‘Win Lose” by both parties.  The producers knew that if they changed the contract to a profit splitting system, they would make more money because of the increase in revenue from advertising.  The writers knew this and so the negotiation begins.  Had the writers not been aware of this revenue increase, the producers may have gotten away with changing to contract to their advantage.  Negotiation has nothing to do with withholding information, however, that withholding may have work to the advantage of the producers.  The writers used a strike as a form of negotiation and also, according to the producers, did not put much time into the meeting held to come to an agreement.  Therefore, dishonestly and game playing came into play more so than any negotiating in my opinion and both parties were out for themselves.

Dessler, G. (2011). A Framework for Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. ISBN: 9780132556378.

Instructor DeYoung Email this Author 6/27/2013 4:26:06 AM
The producer’s argument that WGA was not bargaining in good faith is a fair one just given the definition of good faith bargaining.  Dessler defines good faith bargaining as “proposals that are matched with counter-proposals and that both parties make every reasonable effort to arrive at an agreement” (Dessler, 2011, p. 276).  The evidence of WGA’s lack of good faith bargaining is shown by their silence at 6 cross table meetings as well as the time that they left the table of one of the bargaining meetings after only one hour.  This behavior does not show good faith attempts to reach a compromise.

SUPPOSITION: There is no conflict different between the two because good faith bargaining refers to the duty of the parties to meet and negotiate at reasonable times with willingness to reach agreement on matters within the scope of representation.  Do you feel the bold content above is sufficiently measurable to assess good faith bargaining?

David Teeter Email this Author 6/26/2013 6:42:31 PM
1.     The producers said the WGA was not bargaining in good faith. What did they mean by that, and do you think the evidence is sufficient to support the claim?

The two groups had met for negotiations six times within no movement.  “We have had six across the table sessions and there was only silence and stonewalling from the WGA leadership” (Dessler, 2011, p. 288).  “… the producers claimed that the WGA negotiation committee left one meeting after less than an hour at the bargaining table” (Dessler, 2011, p. 288).

2.     The WGA did eventually strike. What tactics could the producers have used to fight back once the strike began?

The producers had a number of tactics they had at their deposal.  The could have “shut down the affected Area”; “contract out work”; continue operations, perhaps using supervisors and other non-striking workers”; “hiring replacements”; “lock outs”; and “injunctions” (Dessler, 2011, p. 280).

What tactics do you think the WGA used?

The WGA kept negotiations continuing getting closer to the current contract expiration.  Also, “in a separate set of negotiations, the Directors Guild of America reached an agreement with the producers that addressed many of the issues that the writers were focusing on, such as how to divide the new media income” (Dessler, 2011, p. 288)  This had an effect of placing pressure on the producers.  Also, it gave a template for the WGA.

3.     This was a conflict between professional and creative people (the WGA) and TV and movie producers. Do you think the conflict was therefore different in any way than are the conflicts between, say, the auto workers or Teamsters unions against auto and trucking companies? Why?

The basic points were the same between the WGA and the producers as with the Teamsters unions and the auto and trucking companies.  Both groups address “wages, hours, rest periods, layoffs, transfers, benefits, and severance pay” (Dessler, 2011, p. 277) as required by the National Labor Relations Act.

4.     What role (with examples, please) did negotiating skills seem to play in the WGA-producers negotiations?

In the beginning, there were no negotiating skills other than to meet.  Each side had “clear objectives for every bargaining item” (Dessler, 2011, 278).  This was evidence with the largest issue of how to split income from DVDs, etc.  The WGA did “not hurry” (Dessler, 2011, 278).  “Even after meeting six times, it seemed that , “the parties” only apparent area of agreement is that no real bargaining has yet to occur” (Dessler, 2011, 278).  Each side was “well prepared with firm data supporting your position” (Dessler, 2011, 278).  “The producers said they wanted a profit-splitting system rather than the current residual system” (Dessler, 2011, 278).  There are many other skills and guidelines which each side used.

David Teeter

Dessler, G. (2011).  A framework for human resource management (sixth edition).  Upper Saddler River, NJ, Pearson Education, Inc.

Jennifer Moore Email this Author 6/26/2013 6:50:10 PM
The producers said the WGA was not bargaining in good faith. What did they mean by that, and do you think the evidence is sufficient to support the claim?

By pushing the deadline as they did, the producers felt it was not in good faith, because they felt they were attempting to avoid the deadline at all costs.WGA had primary issues that needed to be addressed such as writers’ credits, residuals, education, legislation registration of written materials, and most important the enforcement of contracts (Morphis, 2012).  It is possible to get the same work done by other writers who are desperate to get in and write. Some will work for free to be discovered just to make money. I spoke to my brother in law who is a writer, he told me that in order to be in the Guild you have to write a project that is acceptable under the WGA to be created for it. There is a point system. There has to be 24 points made in three years, which means that they use highly experienced writers. The producers of a company would still hire not so qualified writers if they wanted too at any time. The minimum amount spent just to help get into the WGA is about $3000 for a sell per writer. Interesting information to say the least.

The WGA did eventually strike. What tactics could the producers have used to fight back once the strike began? What tactics do you think the WGA used?

The producers could have threatened them with just going ahead and hiring other writers who would jump at the chance to be in their shoes. Giving another writer the opportunity with less pay to start would have saved them money and time wasted. WGA only did the strike in order to win jurisdiction and establish appropriate residuals for writing in new media and on the internet (Handler, Nguyen, & Depietri, 2008). There tactics were obvious. They waited it out for the timeline and when they did not comply, they picketed and won their case in the end.

This was a conflict between professional and creative people (the WGA) and TV and movie producers. Do you think the conflict was therefore different in any way than are the conflicts between, say, the autoworkers or Teamsters unions against auto and trucking companies? Why?

Yes, of course. An autoworker or Union worker will not work free, but a writer would just to get their start in the company. It is a completely a different scenario.

What position (with examples, please) did negotiating skills seem to play in the WGA-producers negotiations?

It seems that they used negotiation and collective bargaining as a tool. Using these tools help keep communication open. Good faith and observing all agreements is essential for a good outcome. They tried to come up with strategies to fix the problem. They had to listen to the issues they had. For example, focusing on, such as how to divide the new media income was a number one priority and finally had an agreement reached (Dessler, 2011). In order for them to have come to an agreement, they had to sit down and discuss it rationally. If they had sat down to do just that, things would have turned out differently.

Jen

References

Dessler, G. (2011). A Framework for Human Resource Management. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Handler, C. E., Nguyen, J. D., & Depietri, M. (2008). The WGA Strike: Picketing for a Bigger Piece of the New Media Pie. Retrieved June 26, 2013, from Entertainment and Sports Lawyer: http://www.dwt.com/files/Publication/11457532-ad76-4c0f-a123-f7b98f39a534/Presentation/PublicationAttachment/b98d10a8-d7e3-49f7-a747-fa15b1ff3a75/pubs_WGA%20Writer’s%20Strike%20article.PDF

Morphis, J. N. (2012, July 16). Negotiations Between the WGA and AMPTP:How to Avoid Strikes and Still Promote Members’ Needs.Retrieved June 26, 2013, from PEPPERDINE DISPUTE RESOLUTION LAW JOURNAL: https://law.pepperdine.edu/dispute-resolution-law-journal/issues/volume-twelve/10%20Morphis.pdf

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Collapse Mark as Unread RE: Contract Negotiations Instructor DeYoung Email this Author 6/27/2013 4:26:21 AM
SUPPOSITION: Negotiations are usually a reflection of self-serving bias when one side perceives they are being treated unfairly. Some proffer that third-party assistance could have helped, providing an impartial perspective while potentially resolving an impasse. What is your position on the use of third-party assistance?
Cynthia Brown Email this Author 6/27/2013 6:46:25 AM
 

1. The producers said the WGA was not bargaining in good faith. What did they mean by that, and do you think the evidence is sufficient to support the claim?

 

According to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), one of the rules outlined for collective bargaining for a contract stipulates that “the employer and union are required to meet at reasonable times to bargain in good faith about wages, vacation time, insurance, safety practices and other mandatory subjects” (www.nlrb.gov, para, 3). To determine good faith, the NLRB looks at the totality of circumstances. Both parties must participate actively to find solutions and common ground. The NLRB assures that all parties are coming to the table to, not to go through the motions, but to actively in solutions. Therefore, according to the guidance presented by the NLRB It is clear to see that the WGA was not negotiating in good faith. Instead, the WGA was running the clock to get closer to the October delaine for new contract negotiations and the fall TV season.

2. The WGA did eventually strike. What tactics could the producers have used to fight back once the strike began? What tactics do you think the WGA used?

The WGA did eventually strike regardless of the talks which were taking place. The Producers could have fought back by finding alternative solutions to writing. They could have used different writing teams or they could have aired a different lineup of programming such as reality TV, where little writing is needed.

 

3. This was a conflict between professional and creative people (the WGA) and TV and movie producers. Do you think the conflict was therefore different in any way than are the conflicts between, say, the auto workers or Teamsters unions against auto and trucking companies? Why?

This writer believes that negotiations and outcomes are certainly effected due to the type of worker you are dealing with. It is only natural. Blue-collar working Unions at times can be more grassroots and use a number of different strategies. Saying that, in the end, all Unions generally fight for the same basic principle, which is fairness in compensation.

 

4. What role (with examples, please) did negotiating skills seem to play in the WGA-producers negotiations?

 

The skills that were must prevalent during the negotiations were the WGA’s ability to stall without totally forfeiting the talks. They did just enough to get by. That takes skill and know-how.

WEEK 5 DISC. 2

Juanita Wood Email this Author 6/26/2013 12:40:24 PM
Answer the questions to the case, “The New Safety Program,” at the end of Chapter 10.

APPLICATION EXERCISES Case Incident: The New Safety Program

Employees’ safety and health are very important matters in the laundry and cleaning business. Each dry-cleaning store is a small production plant in which machines, powered by high-pressure steam and compressed air, work at high temperatures washing, cleaning, and pressing garments often under very hot, slippery conditions. Chemical vapors are continually produced, and caustic chemicals are used in the cleaning process. High-temperature stills are almost continually “cooking down” cleaning solvents in order to remove impurities so that the solvents can be reused. If a mistake is made in this process—such as injecting too much steam into the still—a boilover occurs, in which boiling chemical solvent erupts out of the still, onto the floor, and onto anyone who happens to be standing in its way.

As a result of these hazards and the fact that chemically hazardous waste is continually produced in these stores, several government agencies (including OSHA and the Environmental Protection Agency) have strict guidelines regarding the management of these plants. For example, posters have to be placed in each store, notifying employees of their right to be told what hazardous chemicals they are dealing with, and what the proper method is for handling each chemical. Special waste-management firms must be used to pick up and properly dispose of the hazardous waste.

A chronic problem the owners have is the unwillingness on the part of the cleaning-spotting workers to wear safety goggles. Not all the chemicals they use require safety goggles, but some—like the hydrofluorous acid used to remove rust stains from garments—are very dangerous. The latter is kept in special plastic containers because it dissolves glass. Some of the employees feel that wearing safety goggles can be troublesome; they are somewhat uncomfortable, and they also become smudged easily and thus cut down on visibility. As a result, it is sometimes almost impossible to get employees to wear their goggles.

QUESTIONS

1.     How should a dry cleaner go about identifying hazardous conditions that should be rectified? Name four probable hazardous conditions or areas in such a store, based on dry-cleaning stores that you have seen.

Signs should be posted in all areas that a hazardous condition could occur.  Also posted on these signs, it would be a good idea to post directions explaining how to properly clean up the mess so that others do not get hurt.  Hazardous conditions could be baskets or trash in the middle of the floor for people to step on and slip and fall.  By the wash tanks especially could be a hazardous area because water or detergents could splash to the floor and cause it to be very slippery.  The stock room is also a very dangerous place because it gets hot and contains all of the different cleaners and detergents.

2.     Would it be advisable for such a firm to set up a procedure for screening out accident-prone individuals?

Yes, getting rid of accident prone workers would be best for these companies.  People who are prone to having accidents can cause a lot of damage to a laundrymat.  Not to mention the possible cost of cleaning up the contaminates, but we must look at the damage that is caused by spills made by careless employees.  I would say that after a handful of mistakes, that person should be put out because they are just hurtful to the company in general.

3.   How would you suggest that owners get all employees to behave more safely at work? Also, how would you advise them to get those who should be wearing goggles to do so?

To get the employees to work more safely I would post signs everywhere with directions on how to clean up each different type of mess.  I would also make it mandatory for all employees to wear goggles with their uniforms.  Place cameras on the attendant stations and when caught not wearing the goggles as instructed fire them for being a liability.  They must realize that the uniform, including the goggles are there to help protect everyone including themselves.

 

Dessler, Gary. Framework for Human Resource Management, A, 6/e Vitalsource eBook for Ashford University. Pearson Learning Solutions.

 

Nita Wood

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Collapse Mark as Unread RE: The New Safety Program Instructor DeYoung Email this Author 6/26/2013 12:49:07 PM
Using screening to reduce unsafe acts is a preventative measure for employing accident prone individuals. The technique is to identify the human trait, such as visual skill that might relate to accidents on the job (Dessler, 2011). This is not 100% guaranteed, and that is why mishaps are usually called accidents. Do you proscribe to the belief that we can accurately traits specific to accident proneness in individuals?

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Collapse Mark as Unread WEEK 5 DISCUSSION 2 Cynthia Brown Email this Author 6/27/2013 6:48:24 AM
1. How should a dry cleaner go about identifying hazardous conditions that should be rectified? Name four probable hazardous conditions or areas in such a store, based on dry-cleaning stores that you have seen.

 

“There were over 3.8 million occupational injuries and illnesses at work—roughly 4.4 cases per 100 full-time U.S workers, per year”(Dessler,2011, P. 294). Employers of dry cleaning businesses should constantly be on the lookout for hazards within their workplace. One of the biggest hazardous conditions I have seen in a dry-cleaner is the lack of steam-guards in and around steaming areas. Many of these areas have a very hot amount of steam which rises up from the garment being cleaned. The chemicals used would be another hazard. Many cleaners leave cleaning chemicals unlocked and in unsuitable areas of the store. Piles of clothing can also act as a hazard by blocking walk areas or obstructing work stations.

Lastly, the racks which hold customer garments are often electrical or automated. These racks must have a capacity limit; however, in this writer’s dry-cleaning store these racks are often overloaded which presents a hazard. I have visited my dry cleaners many times and I have never witnessed any of the employees wearing any kind of protective gear or clothing.

 

 

2. Would it be advisable for such a firm to set up a procedure for screening out accident-prone individuals?

I don’t advise that a screening process be done for uncoordinated or accident prone individuals. The testing would almost be impossible. I at times consider myself accident-prone because I fall so much but how can you test me for that?  A work place should be prepared for any accidents that occur whether those involved are accident prone or not. Accidents happen and in order to take precautions I do not think it is to wean out those who you may think will cause the accident.

3. How would you suggest that owners get all employees to behave more safely at work? Also, how would you advise them to get those who should be wearing goggles to do so?

I would recommend a storewide safety campaign which would engage the employees on several different levels. Social media would be one of the first areas to exploit as part of this campaign. Recently, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) lunched a new initiative and downloadable App to have regular citizens help solve outbreaks (www.cdc.gov). Initiative such as these make people part of the solution. The dry-cleaner could encourage employees to encourage each other to keep an eye out for safety hazards, and it could also enlist the help of costumers to keep an eye out and report hazards they witness while in the store. They could email or text their concerns to the store manager.  The owners need to be hands on and provide employees with all the details and reasons why it is so important to take precautions. If it is a requirement of the job then all employees that should be wearing goggles, should be!

 

http://www.cdc.gov/socialmedia/

 

Dessler, G. (2011). A Framework for Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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Collapse Mark as Unread Week 5 Discussion 2 – David Teeter David Teeter Email this Author 6/27/2013 1:51:53 PM
1.     How should a dry cleaner go about identifying hazardous conditions that should be rectified?

Voluntary consultation from OSHA is one step which might be taken. “OSHA provides free on-site safety and health services for small businesses, using state government safety experts” (Dessler, 2011, p. 294).  Also, checklists are available on OSHA’s website which the employer can use with the business.  In addition, the EPA and OSHA require hazardous material information sheets for each hazardous material.  These sheets should be available at each location for each material within the small stores.  A safety walks through of each store and the main plant should take place a minimum of once a month.

Name four probable hazardous conditions or areas in such a store, based on dry-cleaning stores that you have seen.

As stated in the exercise, “a chronic problem the owners have is the unwillingness on the part of the cleaning-spotting workers to wear safety goggles” (Dessler, 2011, p. 318).  This is a major problem in the safety arena.  With the use of steam, burns are another hazard.  In addition, the possibility of “a boilover occurs, in which boiling chemical solvent erupts out of the still, onto the floor, and onto anyone who happens to be standing in its way” (Dessler, 2011, p. 318).  Slips and falls are another concern.  Ventilation is necessary because of the fumes from hazardous materials.  Mechanical equipment can be hazardous.  The trollies used to store and move finished garments for employees.

2.     Would it be advisable for such a firm to set up a procedure for screening out accident-prone individuals?

A screening of accident-prone individuals is recommended.  “The basic technique is to identify the human trait (such as visual skill) that might relate to accidents on the specific job.  Thus, screening prospective delivery drivers for impatience and aggressiveness might be sensible” (Dessler, 2011, p. 302).  Because of the need to transport the clothing to and from the main plant, drivers will be used.  One way to screen the drivers is to look for traits of entitlement, impatience, and aggressiveness (Dessler, 2011, p. 301).

3.     How would you suggest that owners get all employees to behave more safely at work?

Safety training is essential.  Many organizations make available safety training.  Also, because the stores are scattered, the training can be accomplished by the use of intranet or internet.  The employer and supervisors can contact a trade association to see if they have safety training available.  One way to emphasize the need for being safe is to have a “safety down day”.  During this day, the employer would have all the employees come to the main plant for safety training.  The U.S. Army has mandatory safety down days twice a year and, if necessary, more often.  The U.S. Air Force also has mandatory safety days.  The supplement these days when there is a trend of major accidents.  The U.S. Navy and Marines have similar safety down days.  On these days, every ship will stop, and all personnel will take safety training.  These safeties down days focus on how to prevent accidents and to keep all personnel safe.

Also, how would you advise them to get those who should be wearing goggles to do so?

Emphasize the need to wear goggles.  Also, have a policy, in writing, in place and require all employees to ready and sign a statement that they have read and understand the policy.  If any employees are found to not wearing the safety goggles, then disciplinary actions should be taken, to the point of discharge.

David Teeter

Dessler, G. (2011).  A framework for human resource management (sixth edition).  Upper Saddle River, NJ, Pearson Education, Inc.

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